Author Topic: Parkour progression  (Read 6655 times)

Offline coach hag

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Parkour progression
« on: December 11, 2009, 05:53:04 PM »
Does anyone have a list of every parkour move?
Another question
Would anyone have a progression as to how someone should start and progress or some sort of ranking in difficulty of all the parkour movements?
For example a tic tac, probably considered a very basic move, compared to a palm spin or wall spin which are much mroe difficult.



Offline Hannah W

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Re: Parkour progression
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2009, 05:59:01 PM »
Hi coach hag,

So, right off the bat, parkour isn't really about specific movements per se.

That having been said, however, there are a lot of "moves" that are used frequently by nearly all.  One of the best places to go for the information you are looking for is the "Tutorials" section of APK.

http://www.americanparkour.com/content/category/4/60/377/

Hope this helps!

Offline Scott Berson

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Re: Parkour progression
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2009, 06:23:17 PM »
As said, parkour and freerunning are both not about doing a pre-set list of movements or tricks. They are about experimenting with your own style of movement and conditioning yourself that way. The tutorials section covers a list of moves, kind of like a toolbox of sorts, that are the basics of parkour or freerunning movement.

Take the time to learn these first. This toolbox of sorts with things like correct landing, rolling, and simple vaults are the way to start. As you increase your skill, you will be able to increase your repertoire of movements until you have most of them at a sufficient level. They key here is not to be so caught up in the training that you're taking all kinds of crazy drops and jumps all of a sudden. While it will seem like you're doing fine, you will be doing damage that could cause an injury later.

So be careful and progress steadily...that doesn't you have to do hours of conditioning each day, it just means what it is...progress slowly.



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Offline RedEye420

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Re: Parkour progression
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2009, 09:57:37 PM »
here's a quick list...not listed in order of difficulty or anything...

Precision Jumps
Rolls
Safety Vaults
Speed Vaults
Lazy Vaults
Monkey Vaults
Kong Vaults
Reverse Vaults
Turn Vaults
Cat Leaps
Gate Vaults
Dash Vaults
Underbars
Tic Tacs
Wall Runs
Landings

Palm Spins and Wall Spins are more in the realm of tricking and freerunning....



Offline Brian Rowe

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Re: Parkour progression
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2009, 10:37:13 PM »
Allow me to try and clarify the seeming contradiction here. As a few others have said, there are no set movements in parkour. In fact, sitting on your butt could be just as much a part of parkour as a sprinting vault, under the right circumstances (in a hurry and happen upon a street luge?). Over the years, certain movements proved exceptionally useful and have been refined and named for easy reference. You will be severely limiting your abilities if you concentrate on learning "moves," as opposed to exploring movement in general.

Offline RedEye420

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Re: Parkour progression
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2009, 01:08:13 AM »
true you're going to get the argument that parkour isn't defined as set "moves" and should just focus on movement itself but i understand what you're going for...you need a set list of "moves" and goals to create somekind of basic training system around....that's why i provided a simple list of parkour motions that will be beneficial to your training....not that these moves are all basic, they should all be practiced with the use of soft mats that will be forgiving for first timers...by the way sitting on your butt isn't parkour...i don't care about the circumstances....that's just silly and over-exaggerated...

Offline Jesse Wharton

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Re: Parkour progression
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2009, 05:58:45 AM »
While that may be true there are quite a bit of moves that should be learned as a base for any finding your own path stuff.

Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Parkour progression
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2009, 06:03:13 AM »
I'll take the time to say what I say in most interviews.

For people arguing that you shouldn't do a defined set of moves, you may be "correct" but that isn't helpful to a beginner.

I'll use the example of playing piano. I'll make the argument that "true music" is what happens when you sit down and just play what comes out of you naturally, without thinking I'm going to play "THESE NOTES".

I'll then compare that true parkour or freerunning is when you are outside and "just go" and move over obstacles to the best of your ability without thinking "I'm going to do THIS move".

Now, lets go to learning. If you walk into a piano lesson, and you sit down, and the instructor tells you to "just play what comes naturally" you will tell them to f#%& off and ask for your money back.

You need to learn where Middle C is first. Then you learn the individual notes. Then scales. Agility Drills. Chords, finger placement. The you learn to read music (we're a few months in now) and with a ton of practice maybe you can "sight read". Then, maybe you learn to play along with the radio, playing what someone else created. A good strategy might be to try to integrate that early on, but it will be frustrating unless you're simply a natural. Finally, one day, you sit down, no sheet music, no radio, and you play what you feel, and it will be beautiful. Had you sat on your first day and played what you feel, chances are it would not be beautiful. Try it :)

I personally feel the a similar progression applies to parkour and freerunning. A new practitioner benefits from guidance. Yes, it is entirely possible for one to go outside and start going over obstacles and they will learn and improve. However, there are also basic building blocks that will help someone to learn more safe, effective techniques in less time, and get them to a point of greater proficiency faster if they are taught those methods. This does not negate or change that parkour is moving through your environment in the most effective way for your body, your mind and that freerunning is about exploring your space and your creativity and your movement. What it does is suggest a learning path that builds on the experience of people who have done something before.

It is possible to teach yourself to play the piano, and you can skip any of the steps above (notes, scales, chords) however that may not be the most effective way to learn piano.

It is possible to teach yourself parkour and or freerunning, however that may not be the most effective way. There are tutorials, videos, books, classes, etc. Any of those can be skipped, and it is still possible to learn and become good at parkour or freerunning, but is it the most effective way? Again, it is essential to move yourself, nobody carries you over obstacles and you need to find your own strengths and weaknesses and take those tools and apply them your own way. One day, when you just go out and move, it will be beautiful.

I challenge someone to make a reasonable argument to the contrary.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2009, 06:07:09 AM by Mark Toorock »
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Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Parkour progression
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2009, 06:12:37 AM »
BTW Coach, I argue that the tic-tac is a product of the most important "move" in parkour. At Primal Fitness we take a full week to teach cadence and foot placement. I'll pose another challenge statement:

I believe that the most important "moves" in parkour are the last step before an obstacle and the first step after an obstacle.

If you don't carry your momentum, power, and speed (redundant on purpose) into a move, and you don't carry them out of a move, then you are not moving effectively.
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Offline Jesse Wharton

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Re: Parkour progression
« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2009, 08:37:58 AM »
Wow +1

Offline coach hag

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Re: Parkour progression
« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2009, 11:09:07 AM »
Thank you everyone, especially Mark.  This discussion and feedback is helping me plan lessons for 3 separate boys PE classes.  We will work on what is suggested.  I have a lot to learn but feel I have started off on the right foot.  my guys are excited about what we have done already.  Perhaps I should retract what I am calling these lessons and simply say we are doing parkour and freerunning.  Either way the exploration in these movements are motivating my students, as well as myself, in new ways.  When a teacher is planning a 45 minute session and 30 some kids there must be a focal point.  This is why it is necessary to identify a particular movement.  This is a work in progress so thank you for educating, encouraging, and steering me in the right direction.  This week we are going to focus on vaults.   

Offline Spencer B

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Re: Parkour progression
« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2009, 01:46:38 PM »
I like what you're doing, I do. I think it's great, but this is kind of a big deal I feel.

You're teaching, in a public school, am I right, parkour?

This could be a major step in having it exposed to an extent to more people, especially through the schools.

You have to be very careful about form, teaching them against drops, against stupid actions. We are not  daredevils, we take this all very seriously we are careful and we stress progression and caution.

Do this, teach them to move and teach them to do it right. How to run right, how to land right, roll, breathe, squat. Make this the priority and you will truly teach them; teach them to move and to fly. Good luck man.
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Offline Cheshire Parkour

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Re: Parkour progression
« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2009, 02:27:10 PM »
listing "moves" sounds like a really good idea in theory, as a guide to help u learn, and to train, but in theory it doesnt really help. sure, u know how to do certain things, but really you base your vault or "move" as to what obstacle it is, and the situation, and you can modify.
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