Author Topic: Broken Collarbone  (Read 2355 times)

Offline Chris "Krazian" Oshiro

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Broken Collarbone
« on: April 05, 2008, 09:32:59 PM »
Hey,

I live in Ohio and we are finally getting some decent weather after a long and cold winter. Today was a great day to train cause it was 55 and sunny out. It was about an hour and a half in when I went to kong from a low pillar (about 1 foot of the ground) to a higher one (about 3 feet high). It's something I have done many times and it's actually how I learned to kong in the first place because it causes you to dive forward slightly to clear it. Well when I dove for the second pillar my hands hit and when I went to push off my left hand slide off the pillar. Before I could do anything I hit the ground with left shoulder and the side of my head.

Right after it happened I just rolled over and laid down for a few cause my head was spinning and I thought I had a concussion. After getting up I stretched my arm and I felt a popping sensation in my left collarbone area. When I felt it I noticed a crack in the bone and part of it was close to the skin. I was pretty sure at that point what happened so I drove home told my mom and we headed to the ER. After getting a couple of X-Rays done, the ER doc. confirmed I had broken my clavicle (collarbone). So unfortunately I'm down and out for about 3-6 weeks.

My question is, is there anything I can do to maintain some strength since I can't use my left arm? I'm definitely not doing anything for at least a week. I would love some input in things to work on while I'm healing. Any advice would be great, Thanks.

P.S I forgot to include that I have been doing parkour for over a year and haven't had any incidents like this ever before.

~Chris

Offline Steve Low

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Re: Broken Collarbone
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2008, 10:01:34 PM »
Doing some strength work with the right arm will help maintain strength in the left arm. Don't aggravate your left though cause that prolongs recover time... find stuff that doesn't hurt. Preferably compounds like overhead press and such.

Otherwise, work other important stuff like flexibility and conditioning for legs.
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JBF28

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Re: Broken Collarbone
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2008, 03:06:37 PM »
Chris man that sucks, were you at that series of pillars under the bridge?   I haven't gone in so long i can't even remember the exact spot you are talking about :(

good luck hombre

Offline Chris "Krazian" Oshiro

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Re: Broken Collarbone
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2008, 03:59:16 PM »
Thanks man!
Yeah that's the spot I was at when it happened. :-\
When I'm back up and running we definitely need to get some training in. I haven't done anything with you in months!

Offline Chris Salvato

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Re: Broken Collarbone
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2008, 05:34:18 PM »
air squats and pistols will likely be a good friend of yours in the coming weeks.

Also, use your opposite arm to do lightweight activities to keep your injured arm strong.  There is significant data that shows that training movement on one side can help maintain/improve movement on the other.  Try to keep it light to avoid asymmetrical stresses, however.

Working things like air squats and pistols will keep your growth hormones pumping and will actually help improve recovery time of your injured collarbone. Other suggestions include one armed dumbbell/kettlebell deadlifts, cleans, swings and presses. 

DO NOT STOP TRAINING -- if you do, this will likely lengthen your recovery time.

Also, u can train low impact things like tuck jumps to silent landings, balance work on a very low rail and tripedal movement (its possible -- watch a 3 legged cat run).