Author Topic: Techniques in Parkour  (Read 87802 times)

psycosis12

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #20 on: March 16, 2006, 05:18:54 PM »
well i gave you a cool click for that, your absolutely right about that too.............man, that was deep

Offline Corndogg

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #21 on: March 20, 2006, 08:55:52 PM »
word and word.  more peeps need to learn this for sure.  my biggest worry about PK in the US is that it catches on as some "X-treme sport" on ESPN2 or something, so the more traceurs keep this in mind, the better!
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Offline DistortedTruth

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #22 on: June 08, 2006, 02:21:32 PM »
Well, thank you Asa.  That clears up a misconception that I myself had.  Thank you.  I shall not look at it that way anymore.  Good analogy btw.  It helps a beginner learn how to look at Parkour.  (Like me).
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Offline Trip56

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #23 on: July 08, 2006, 09:33:52 PM »
Corndogg, I think that if parkour does end up on ESPN2, it will probably be under a different name. And not to be obvious, but parkour isn't a competition. It's good that parkour gets some media exposure, but when mainstream dilutes it into what they want, we're screwed.

Back on topic, I personally think that it's good to have a "base" set of moves in parkour. Say you're coming up to an obstacle that you haven't encountered before and you don't want to stop, you already have a pretty good idea of what you're going to do and you won't hurt yourself anywhere near as bad because you have already practiced a technique to overcome it.

Offline colin jensen

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #24 on: August 04, 2006, 08:36:15 PM »
this is true trip however you shouldnt be limited to things you have only done in training. if theres a more eficient way to overcome it that you havent tried try it anyway.
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Offline Dr. Unoriginal

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #25 on: December 04, 2006, 04:46:36 AM »
Corndogg, I think that if parkour does end up on ESPN2, it will probably be under a different name. And not to be obvious, but parkour isn't a competition. It's good that parkour gets some media exposure, but when mainstream dilutes it into what they want, we're screwed.

Back on topic, I personally think that it's good to have a "base" set of moves in parkour. Say you're coming up to an obstacle that you haven't encountered before and you don't want to stop, you already have a pretty good idea of what you're going to do and you won't hurt yourself anywhere near as bad because you have already practiced a technique to overcome it.
Who cares if the sport is dilluted by the media? How does that effect what the individual can do in the sport.

Offline Joe Ramos

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #26 on: December 04, 2006, 11:34:49 AM »
Quote
Who cares if the sport is dilluted by the media? How does that effect what the individual can do in the sport.

Well the problem with it being diluted by the media is that everyone will stop looking at the mental part of it. If it goes on espn2 then people will think "o hey i can do that" jump a fence and think they are "doing parkour" if this goes on for long enough parkour will really cease to exist and we will have another event for X games or something like that. If you want to think of the big picture, after we are all gone, and this espn2 rehash of something great has been around for some time, people wont know what it was we were really doing. We will be looked at as "skateboarding without a board" and something that used to have a lot of meaning will be dead. in its place will be something that wants to be parkour but never will and its just messing up peoples perspective of it... phew whata rant

Offline Joey Marion

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #27 on: January 09, 2007, 06:23:34 PM »
great analogy. it kind of puts a different perspective on pk. I am fairly new. + karma for you
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crazyted

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #28 on: January 17, 2007, 11:10:45 AM »
exactly!

Offline Chris [.5gibbon] Stevenson!

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #29 on: March 31, 2007, 12:39:55 PM »
perfect!    this entire thread hits the nail right on the head,  many times. ;D
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Offline analog.anarchy

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #30 on: April 01, 2007, 08:21:57 PM »
i really agree with trip here. on espn it would definately go under freerunning and the effiency roots would be ignored. thats all my thoughts on that.

Offline jamminb0111

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #31 on: April 04, 2007, 05:38:59 PM »
I reall wonder what professional freerunning would look like. would they have a set of obstacles or like an obstacle course
 :-\

Offline Hunter Neiblum

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #32 on: April 14, 2007, 09:05:20 PM »
I reall wonder what professional freerunning would look like. would they have a set of obstacles or like an obstacle course
 :-\
I sure hope there isn't such a thing, I hope this sport never turns into a competitive sport or a finanshal one either!

just a thought
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Offline Laurie Jennifer

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #33 on: April 19, 2007, 12:08:09 PM »
I'm typing this post in response to the apparent confusion of people in this forum when it comes to techniques in Parkour. To the casual observer, traceurs do "moves" to pass obstacles. A common misconception arises from this: that Parkour is a collection of "moves", and that there is a list of "Parkour moves" that, when preformed, are Parkour.

Individual techniques are not what makes up Parkour. Instead, it is your mindset that determines whether or not your actions are within the realm of Parkour. Without the correct intent, these movements are not being used for Parkour. This is what separates Parkour from other activities, the purposefulness.

There is no list that encompasses all motions that can be used in Parkour. This being said, there ARE some movements that are especially useful that many traceurs use as a base skill set in Parkour. These techniques are used very often because of their versatility and effectivness. These include the saut de chat (kong), saut de bras (cat leap), breakfalls, demi tour (turn vault), tic-tac, and passe muraille (wall climb) , among others.

However, as I said before, none of these movements are Parkour in and of themselves. Picture two cardboard boxes. One is filled with books, while the other contains nothing but air. At first glance, to the average observer, the boxes will be appear to be identical. Similarly, unless filled by the proper purpose, these techniques which would appear the same, are simply empty "moves".

I feel the same way!  This is why I can't bring my self to "do a move" just because, for the hell of it.  I mean, why, if it's out of my way or inefficient or impractical?  I'm going from A-to-B, not stopping to leap over a random wall that's not in my immediate intended path...
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Offline Gregg HIPK

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #34 on: April 24, 2007, 01:53:59 PM »
I know there are times I've changed my path just to jump some extra railings. Just for fun. Does that mean my mindset has changed from PK to freerunning for that extra ten feet? Probably.

There's a whole thread on competition. Check it out.

Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #35 on: May 24, 2007, 08:33:08 PM »
Just to back up Asa's original point:

This is very true for a lot of disciplines. In martial arts, for example, you do tons of stance drills, kicking and punching drills, and forms. You practice them over and over until they are in your muscle memory and mind and heart. However, when you use your martial arts in competition or some other situation, you don't do the forms and drills; you just do what you need to do as the situation calls for it.

To draw another analogy, ballet is the same thing. I can walk into any ballet class anywhere in the world and know what to expect. We will do barre exercises, and they will go in a specific order; and then we will dance in the centre and those exercises will go in a specific order. However, this is all in preparation for performance. No one does barre and centre on stage (no one would pay to see it!) However the idea is to train those movements so specifically and instinctively that the dancer can handle any choreography given for performance; and beyond that, can manage any sort of event that might happen in performance (e.g. a shoe breaking, a slippery spot on the floor, etc.) with grace and aplomb.

The training is not the art form; the training is the development of a toolbox with which to engage in the art form. Technique is the basis: you have to learn the rules to such precision and expertise that you can break them on the fly if the discipline asks it of you. However every movement comes from and returns to the technique you have spent weeks/months/years developing.

I can only perform "Snow" in my ballet company's "Nutcracker," dancing for a mere 6 minutes, because I have trained for over 20 years on an daily basis to develop the muscle memory and physical experience necessary to get me through that 6 minutes. There is so much that happens "invisibly" behind what is seen on the surface. What the audience sees is the *result* of those 20+ years, but not those 20 years' training. What's happened inside those studio walls, behind the theatre, is between me, my body, my teachers, and my artistic director. I consider it all to be ballet, but there is a significant difference between a dancer who has only class/technical experience, and a dancer who also has performance experience. IMO, the former is missing a substantial component of the art form.

Two thumbs up for Asa. :)
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she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
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Offline Powell

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #36 on: June 11, 2007, 01:04:27 PM »
I've been following this topic and reading the posts, thanks people a lot of insight here.  I'd have to say with moves and parkour, the moves aren't the goal: parkour is.  The moves; kongs, muscle ups; they are the means to the end, with the end being parkour.  And hey, after all, the point is to have fun and get from point A to point B.  How you do it is your decision.

Offline Parkournoob99

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #37 on: June 24, 2007, 07:28:45 AM »
2 thumbs up, asa. if parkour ever gets bigger, alot of people would say "i can do that!" and then they do a monkey vault and faceplant.


would you mind posting it on UFF and other places such as myspace? thanks Asa,

Offline Muhammad

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #38 on: June 24, 2007, 07:50:51 AM »
2 thumbs up, asa. if parkour ever gets bigger, alot of people would say "i can do that!" and then they do a monkey vault and faceplant.

Like this? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPX_QAnQjZ0

Offline Tonyy

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Re: Techniques in Parkour
« Reply #39 on: June 27, 2007, 09:51:10 AM »
Well said!  :D