Author Topic: Competition in Parkour  (Read 42966 times)

Offline Conrad Moser

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #40 on: October 19, 2011, 05:21:24 PM »
Competiton does not have to be cutthroat, it can be fun and good-natured which by and large is how it's done in the pk/fr communities. Having a good time with some friendly cometition is not misinformation.
Age is just another obstacle. Get over it.

Offline 7Erik7

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #41 on: October 19, 2011, 11:41:24 PM »
You CAN measure what kind of move is better than someone else's because the end goal is whatever we want to make the goal as.  ie, speed, technique, etc.  The goal determines how to measure "better" or "worse."  Now the individual's goal, sure, that's his/her to determine, but you're not discussing the topic by establishing that parkour has different purposes for different people.  If the goal is to be a hottie in soccer, doesn't mean that competitions can't happen is soccer. (based on your logic)

You CAN tell how much damage a certain movement will do.  This should be obvious and I don't need to defend this beyond the idea than if someone lands on their neck, they CERTAINLY did more damage than someone who landed on their feet.

All your other points address the person, not the competition, so--I don't see what you're saying.  Again, pertaining to soccer, if someone plays soccer to "be helpful to people" in his or her daily life, it doesn't mean that competitions can't happen or shouldn't happen.

We aren't narrow mindedly saying that parkour has no benefit beyond the physical discipline, but obviously we have to measure the physical discipline itself when in competition.  Again, soccer or tennis or anything, there are points to determine the winner.  By eliminating points just because we aren't addressing how much the person trained or how hard they tried in their daily life--how does that make a competition or those who promote competition selfish?

It's funny people that like these competitions always go on about how parkour only is about movements. While that isn't one hundred percent true, there is some truth in it, but no one can measure what kind of movement that is the best one simply because it depends on the practitioners goal. While I do agree that parkour has diffrent goal for diffrent people that doesn't mean it's competetive simply because in order to make parkour competetive you'll have to strip away a lot from It's core philosopy. In that way it becomes just another sport, the meaning gets lost, and the name doesn't mean anything. With damage I am not talking about people landing on their neck or breaking their leg. I am talking about longterm damage. For how long will this people have a functional body? Are their bodies prepared for what they're doing?

It's all about to be and to last, and if you train for 10 years in order to compete, and then your body fails you, you have failed. Parkour is about longterm training. Competition, on the other hand, is for shortterm training, and the reason why people compete is quite simple. People compete because they get sponsored, because they get famous, and seen as a profesional athlete - and they are profesional athletes - but as parkour practitioners they're more like clowns or something.

Quote
We aren't narrow mindedly saying that parkour has no benefit beyond the physical discipline, but obviously we have to measure the physical discipline itself when in competition.  Again, soccer or tennis or anything, there are points to determine the winner.  By eliminating points just because we aren't addressing how much the person trained or how hard they tried in their daily life--how does that make a competition or those who promote competition selfish?

This is exactly my point: we have to measure the physical discipline itself when in competition. This means that you remove a great deal of parkour simply because that's the only way to make a competition out of it. This means that it isn't parkour anymore. It becomes just a physical sport. A sport is a sport, and certain things has to be changed in order to make parkour fit into this category.

Humans like to impress. It's a drive inside us and it have existed for a loooong time. I don't care what people say but I simply refuse to believe that people go to parkour competitions just in order to have fun. You can have fun at a normal jam.

Here is the rub:

At competition there's cameras everywhere, there's a big shouting crowd, you may get sponsored, and It's a great way to show yourself as a profesional athlete - exactly like Livewire said - and that's mainly why people go to competitions. Sure - it's obviously fun for these people - but that's not the real reason behind it. The reason behind it is selfish. People do it in order to gain a certain repuptation, in order to make a living out of it, in order to impress etcetc. So how is it not selfish? How can people deny that humans are extremely drived to impress others?

If you want to make parkour into a sport you can't measure everything that parkour is about. We can all agree on that. Now, if you do try to measure this in terms of competitions, you'll have to remove everything that you can't measure. This means that it isn't parkour anymore.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2011, 11:48:08 PM by 7Erik7 »

Offline Ryan A. Vetter

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #42 on: October 24, 2011, 10:58:34 AM »
Why should competition be litmited to a one-at-a-time basis? I've mulled the ideas over in my mullet-covered brain and have come to multiple conclusions, and ideas.

Speed Courses:
He/she who finishes with the fastest time wins, regardless of move implimentations.

Style Courses:
The idea is to have a set line of obstacles, where points are awarded for speed (finishing time), fluid motions (using moves that string together to keep momentum up), tic-tac combos being worth more, and astonishments (the application of a movement or move that wasn't thought of or wasn't originally intended for said obstacle.)

Points would be deducted for series repeats (repeating a move twice in row or more), not finishing at target time (say the end line must be crossed by 1 minute), back-tracking (a point for each obstacle that was backtracked.)

Colour Coding:
Why not? Most humans are not colour-blind, and those who are can still tell the difference.

How would you apply it?
You have a string of obstacles, so the following colours can be used to determine how each one should be approached, essentially forcing a traceur to slow-down or actually think instead of just acting based on impulse.

Red; A no touch zone, it can be any one side of the obstacle, all sides, or multiple sides, it can be the ground it self, forcing a traceur to vault the ground an d land just before an obstacle. Touching results in either penalty time, deduction of points, or disqualification based on competition, especially if the red zone is used to aid said person in maneuvers.

Green; A must touch zone, the very same applications as red, but it must be touched no matter what, or the same penalties for red zones apply. You're approaching a four foot abostacle and the top is green, you've got options, quadraped run, speed vault, kong vault etc. The point is it is indeed doable, even if it's just a stretch of green on the pavement, you have to run over it.

Blue: A must pass-through zone, whether it's over, under, inbetween, you have to pass through it, doesn't matter if you touch or don't, it has to happen, failure to do so results in penalties.

Yellow: A must pass-through no-touch zone, the exact same as blue, but no touching, approaching a rail, the left right and bottom rail are yellow, and the top part is blue, and under-rail or vault would be acceptable, failure to not touch results in penalties.

Black: Precision marks, the distance between Mark A and Mark B require the individual to close this gap in a single motion, failure do so has no penalty on the individual but accomplishing the effort rewards additional points. You might guess this would only apply to style competitions and you're right, but in a speed competition it's assumed as a must touch zone, not touching results in penalties.

White lines: Boundaries, passing outside of boundaries results in disqualifications for speed competitions, as the traceur is capable of sprinting around obstacles, although the option should be given on rare occassions to throw traceurs off. For style contests, no penalty is made but it is at sacrifice of the traceur.

Natural object colour: This obstacle or object can be approached in anyway a traceurs pleases. It is not mandatory to touch or not touch but based on the competition style it may be in your best interests.

Tag Competitions:
Multiple traceurs square off in a no-touch tag stealing match. Each traceur is given two tags fastens or places at waist level, the objective is to steal as may tags from opponents before your own are stolen. After both of your tags have been stolen your are benched, so as to not interefere with remaing competitors. In the case of a tie, the tied traceurs square off in a single tag match, where each participant is given one tag fastened at waist level, the objective remains the same, but losing your tag results in loss of points.

In the event of a second tie, again it will be a single tag competition.

The rare event of a third tie, the traceurs that happen to be tied, must square off in a mis-count match, where a ref/judge/official, must wear a single tag, and avoid the other traceurs, while whichever traceur steals the tag, wins the contest overall.

When a tag is stolen it must be returned to a 'depot,' where a judge/ref will tally the amount stolen by each individual. If both or the single tag are stolen from the player on his/her return to the depot, the player must drop all tags he or she is currently carrying, which can be picked up by any remaining traceurs.

In the case two traceurs steal eachother final tag at the same time, both traceurs must drop their tags and remove themselves from the contest area.

Team-tag Competitions:
All the same rules apply, but it's team tag, team with the last player(s) standing wins. Head-to-head matches only, single-elimination tournament. In the rare case of a tie, both teams elect one players for a head-to-head mis-count match, the player whom wins wins it for his/her team.

Mis-count competition:
Much like a Tag contest, players must steal tags, however this time, it's one loss at a time. A single official is given multiple tags to be fastened at waist level. It is up to each traceur to steal a single flag, the amount of flags the official carries is equal to that of participants minus one, so that each and every round a player is eliminated. There is no need for a depot, and in the case a player steals two or more tags by incident, the round will be paused, and all tags will be returned but one.

When a traceur steals a tag he/she will be benched until the next round.

Step-up contests:
In this type of competition a series of obstacle are presented, the following always being more difficult than the prior. Example:

Step-up contest is based on Kong vaults, each following obstacle either gets taller or longer, with a maximum of six feet length and four feet in height.

Traceurs attempt to kong vault each one, if a traceur is incapable of or is afraid to kong vault an obstacle he/she is eliminated, the same results occur when a traceur is injured.

If more than one traceur is capable of kong vaulting all obstacles, it breaks down to a speed competition of strictly kong vaults. He/she with the fastest time wins.

---------------

Disqualification for injury, poor conduct, or attempt to interfere with other competitors or obsructing obstacles.

---------------

I honestly don't think such competitions are hard to implement or gain interest but perhaps they are. It just seems that everybody feels that all competitions breaks down to speed or style, and in fact while the other three suggestions are more childishly based, they do in fact require a form of strategy. At least that's my personal take on the whole matter.

In response to the current disscussion, chess too is a sport, and yet even grand-masters down't make as much as NFL athletes. Can you say WTF? because even a rookie make more than a Grandmaster.
So long as I have parkour I'm okay.

Offline 7Erik7

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #43 on: October 27, 2011, 11:24:24 AM »
Why should competition be litmited to a one-at-a-time basis? I've mulled the ideas over in my mullet-covered brain and have come to multiple conclusions, and ideas.

Speed Courses:
He/she who finishes with the fastest time wins, regardless of move implimentations.

Style Courses:
The idea is to have a set line of obstacles, where points are awarded for speed (finishing time), fluid motions (using moves that string together to keep momentum up), tic-tac combos being worth more, and astonishments (the application of a movement or move that wasn't thought of or wasn't originally intended for said obstacle.)

Points would be deducted for series repeats (repeating a move twice in row or more), not finishing at target time (say the end line must be crossed by 1 minute), back-tracking (a point for each obstacle that was backtracked.)

Colour Coding:
Why not? Most humans are not colour-blind, and those who are can still tell the difference.

How would you apply it?
You have a string of obstacles, so the following colours can be used to determine how each one should be approached, essentially forcing a traceur to slow-down or actually think instead of just acting based on impulse.

Red; A no touch zone, it can be any one side of the obstacle, all sides, or multiple sides, it can be the ground it self, forcing a traceur to vault the ground an d land just before an obstacle. Touching results in either penalty time, deduction of points, or disqualification based on competition, especially if the red zone is used to aid said person in maneuvers.

Green; A must touch zone, the very same applications as red, but it must be touched no matter what, or the same penalties for red zones apply. You're approaching a four foot abostacle and the top is green, you've got options, quadraped run, speed vault, kong vault etc. The point is it is indeed doable, even if it's just a stretch of green on the pavement, you have to run over it.

Blue: A must pass-through zone, whether it's over, under, inbetween, you have to pass through it, doesn't matter if you touch or don't, it has to happen, failure to do so results in penalties.

Yellow: A must pass-through no-touch zone, the exact same as blue, but no touching, approaching a rail, the left right and bottom rail are yellow, and the top part is blue, and under-rail or vault would be acceptable, failure to not touch results in penalties.

Black: Precision marks, the distance between Mark A and Mark B require the individual to close this gap in a single motion, failure do so has no penalty on the individual but accomplishing the effort rewards additional points. You might guess this would only apply to style competitions and you're right, but in a speed competition it's assumed as a must touch zone, not touching results in penalties.

White lines: Boundaries, passing outside of boundaries results in disqualifications for speed competitions, as the traceur is capable of sprinting around obstacles, although the option should be given on rare occassions to throw traceurs off. For style contests, no penalty is made but it is at sacrifice of the traceur.

Natural object colour: This obstacle or object can be approached in anyway a traceurs pleases. It is not mandatory to touch or not touch but based on the competition style it may be in your best interests.

Tag Competitions:
Multiple traceurs square off in a no-touch tag stealing match. Each traceur is given two tags fastens or places at waist level, the objective is to steal as may tags from opponents before your own are stolen. After both of your tags have been stolen your are benched, so as to not interefere with remaing competitors. In the case of a tie, the tied traceurs square off in a single tag match, where each participant is given one tag fastened at waist level, the objective remains the same, but losing your tag results in loss of points.

In the event of a second tie, again it will be a single tag competition.

The rare event of a third tie, the traceurs that happen to be tied, must square off in a mis-count match, where a ref/judge/official, must wear a single tag, and avoid the other traceurs, while whichever traceur steals the tag, wins the contest overall.

When a tag is stolen it must be returned to a 'depot,' where a judge/ref will tally the amount stolen by each individual. If both or the single tag are stolen from the player on his/her return to the depot, the player must drop all tags he or she is currently carrying, which can be picked up by any remaining traceurs.

In the case two traceurs steal eachother final tag at the same time, both traceurs must drop their tags and remove themselves from the contest area.

Team-tag Competitions:
All the same rules apply, but it's team tag, team with the last player(s) standing wins. Head-to-head matches only, single-elimination tournament. In the rare case of a tie, both teams elect one players for a head-to-head mis-count match, the player whom wins wins it for his/her team.

Mis-count competition:
Much like a Tag contest, players must steal tags, however this time, it's one loss at a time. A single official is given multiple tags to be fastened at waist level. It is up to each traceur to steal a single flag, the amount of flags the official carries is equal to that of participants minus one, so that each and every round a player is eliminated. There is no need for a depot, and in the case a player steals two or more tags by incident, the round will be paused, and all tags will be returned but one.

When a traceur steals a tag he/she will be benched until the next round.

Step-up contests:
In this type of competition a series of obstacle are presented, the following always being more difficult than the prior. Example:

Step-up contest is based on Kong vaults, each following obstacle either gets taller or longer, with a maximum of six feet length and four feet in height.

Traceurs attempt to kong vault each one, if a traceur is incapable of or is afraid to kong vault an obstacle he/she is eliminated, the same results occur when a traceur is injured.

If more than one traceur is capable of kong vaulting all obstacles, it breaks down to a speed competition of strictly kong vaults. He/she with the fastest time wins.

---------------

Disqualification for injury, poor conduct, or attempt to interfere with other competitors or obsructing obstacles.

---------------

I honestly don't think such competitions are hard to implement or gain interest but perhaps they are. It just seems that everybody feels that all competitions breaks down to speed or style, and in fact while the other three suggestions are more childishly based, they do in fact require a form of strategy. At least that's my personal take on the whole matter.

In response to the current disscussion, chess too is a sport, and yet even grand-masters down't make as much as NFL athletes. Can you say WTF? because even a rookie make more than a Grandmaster.

I quote my earlier post which pretty much describes the problem with having competitions in parkour.


I’m personally not very fond of competitions mainly becaue I’ve seen friends of mine leaving their hockey team, for instance, because they didn’t want to go for 100%. In my opinion, sport should be focused first on the inviduals, to engage them and keep them active, and second on the competetive nature. But in overall competitions are great in other ways.

However, when someone says that parkour, or freerunning if you wish, is competetive I’d like to burst into a deep old laugh. It’s like claiming that It’s possible to hold a competition Jeet Kun Do. It’s simply not possible because everything in parkour can’t be measured.

You can’t mesaure what kind of move that is better than someone’s else. Because the end goal is to find your own invidual way to move.

You can’t specifically say what kind of goals he or she have

You can’t measure whenever the competitor are doing their movement to impress or not (impressing people is a drive which is in our minds)

You can’t tell how much damage a certain movement do to he or she

You can’t tell whenever the person are doing his or her movement to impress or not.

You can’t tell how helpfull he or she is to other people in his or her daily life.

You can’t tell how creative someone have been in their lifetime by letting them go through an hour of competition.

Because parkour, or freerunning, Is not about following pre-defined physicals goals like in gymnastics. It’s about your personal goals, you own hapiness, and your own journey. For instance, how we could tell how much a person have progressed in their mind? Because parkour have always been as physical as It’s about mental progress which means that if you wan’t to measure how good someone is in parkour you’ll have to look at it for what it is. Denying this is like denying parkour’s existence on mother earth.

Competitions is something you do for play. You have rules and restrictions that automaticly will  remove a great deal of parkour until the only thing that is left is the physical side of it, and then, It’s just a physical dicipline.

In overall, It’s sad that this site promote something like this, aswell as other sites do, and It’s either due to lack of knowledge or selfishness.
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Offline Cory Finch

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #44 on: October 27, 2011, 06:11:35 PM »
I have to say, I really don't like competition.  It often results in good training only being available to those with talent or the time for incredible amounts of practice, it can introduce rules that place artificial constraints on the techniques and plans used by athletes, and it often brings out the worst in people (see, cheating, raging assholery), and encourages things that are downright bad for the participants health (see steroids, playing while injured, dehydrating to meet weigh ins).

That said, there are sports where competition doesn't create these problems, or at least restricts them to the people who choose to compete.  If parkour can follow the same path that many endurance and extreme sports have, then it isn't really a problem, if it ends up looking like gymnastics or many team sports?  Huge problem.

Offline Ryan A. Vetter

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #45 on: October 30, 2011, 11:28:15 AM »
So what you're saying that Parkour is to be kept underground? That just sounds like some sort of punk rock hype, if it's mainstream it isn't okay. You do realise that it just one over-bloated rich person, to start up an "official" Parkour league, then everything goes south.
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Offline Cory Finch

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #46 on: October 30, 2011, 02:44:32 PM »
I'm not sure if you're referring to me or Erik but:
What makes you think competition is the only way to get people involved in parkour?  Roughly a quarter of Americans do martial arts at some point in their lives, and before MMA came along I doubt 1 in 20 had watched a match that their kids weren't in.

Offline DaveS

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #47 on: October 30, 2011, 03:28:21 PM »
So what you're saying that Parkour is to be kept underground? That just sounds like some sort of punk rock hype, if it's mainstream it isn't okay. You do realise that it just one over-bloated rich person, to start up an "official" Parkour league, then everything goes south.
That's already happened. The difficulties we are currently facing are a result of precisely that.

The problem with Parkour becoming mainstream is that the rules by which popular culture operates are different, and contradictory, to the rules by which Parkour operates. To popularize Parkour now, in the short term, would require Parkour to be changed to fit in with current pop culture rules.

This appears to be the aim of those who are involved with promoting the idea of competitions and media-friendly demonstrations and performances. Those ideas are important for pop culture, but they are not at all important for Parkour. What myself and many others would prefer, is for Parkour to continue to maintain it's own current set of values, and all of us to work together to change the values of pop culture. We want pop culture to accept and adapt to Parkour, rather than Parkour to change to fit in to pop culture.

Ultimately pop culture can't win, because Parkour practitioners will always be able to become stronger than any obstacle they are faced with. All we need to do is work hard. The gist of this argument is, we think some people are taking the easy path instead of the difficult path, and the difficult path is always better in the end.
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Offline Eli

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #48 on: November 02, 2011, 09:18:49 AM »
what if there was a competition where it was like a mix of capture the flag and tag. like there is one big area where it is all being played (play zone). you have one flag in the middle of the arena and to win the team has to get the flag back to there starting zone. you would where flags from flag football and if you have the flag and are getting chased and loose a flag then you have to stop and give the main flag to the person that "tagged" you and you have to walk back to you starting zone.

Offline 7Erik7

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #49 on: November 24, 2011, 02:58:13 PM »
So what you're saying that Parkour is to be kept underground? That just sounds like some sort of punk rock hype, if it's mainstream it isn't okay. You do realise that it just one over-bloated rich person, to start up an "official" Parkour league, then everything goes south.

Parkour have had a global impact on everyone. Something that started out in a place like Lisses spread through the whole world. It won't be underground just because you don't have competition. It wont fade away. It's here to stay and it will keep growing. It's such a shame that a great site like this promote rubbish such as competitions. Not only because competition gather the worst kind of people, which cheat in order to win (we've all seen it before) but also because you can't measure someone's parkour in a competition. You can measure movements, but parkour, no.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2011, 03:03:18 PM by 7Erik7 »

Offline Tom Coppola

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #50 on: November 25, 2011, 02:48:02 AM »
Parkour have had a global impact on everyone. Something that started out in a place like Lisses spread through the whole world. It won't be underground just because you don't have competition. It wont fade away. It's here to stay and it will keep growing. It's such a shame that a great site like this promote rubbish such as competitions. Not only because competition gather the worst kind of people, which cheat in order to win (we've all seen it before) but also because you can't measure someone's parkour in a competition. You can measure movements, but parkour, no.

Shut up.  Seriously.
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Offline 7Erik7

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #51 on: November 28, 2011, 04:26:00 AM »
Shut up.  Seriously.

That's a rather harsh opinion. Now, where's the argument that actually could make your statement sound reliable?

Offline 7Erik7

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #52 on: December 02, 2011, 03:47:14 AM »
/second that

It's very easy to have an opinion but a lot harder to have an argument.

Try to explain why you second that.

If you can.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2011, 03:50:19 AM by 7Erik7 »

Offline Ryan Sannar

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #53 on: December 02, 2011, 07:11:05 AM »
There are so many other ways we could take this argument instead of the way we have for years on this forum.
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Offline Ryan Sannar

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #54 on: December 13, 2011, 07:48:13 AM »
Well for example. What alternatives to competition could we do. I know I saw a post on here a little while ago regarding a showcase that was non competitive. How would we organize and run something like that? What about if you had to be competitive what ways could we get it as close to the art of parkour as possible.

It just seems to me like there is either yes or no, which seems very narrow minded to me. I get that "parkour" is non competitive, but I think that has been made very very very very clear. To be honest I bring it up when I'm explaining parkour to others more than once just because its pounded into my head here so often. So acknowledging that very obvious fact, if we did a "competition" with parkour, how can we make it as close to non competitive as possible. While of course still making it something that would pull traceurs and freerunners from all over the world?
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Offline Ryan A. Vetter

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #55 on: December 15, 2011, 10:06:58 AM »
Well for example. What alternatives to competition could we do. I know I saw a post on here a little while ago regarding a showcase that was non competitive. How would we organize and run something like that? What about if you had to be competitive what ways could we get it as close to the art of parkour as possible.

It just seems to me like there is either yes or no, which seems very narrow minded to me. I get that "parkour" is non competitive, but I think that has been made very very very very clear. To be honest I bring it up when I'm explaining parkour to others more than once just because its pounded into my head here so often. So acknowledging that very obvious fact, if we did a "competition" with parkour, how can we make it as close to non competitive as possible. While of course still making it something that would pull traceurs and freerunners from all over the world?
A parkour convention, entry fee, show up, base the competitions off more-or-less childish events, ie: "palm" tag, hide and seek-tag, horse, and even races. Winners get scholarships, Grand winner gets an esteemed title, like 'Grand Parkour Pubah.'

Competition is as follows; Each traceur gets a special wristband, upon paying a "competition fee," traceurs compete in games of their choice. Each game won (Being tagged last, or winning a race, or not getting horse) tallies one point. Each contest must be sponsored by a referee. First X traceurs to 100 points or those with the most within seven days (events can only take place during specific hours, during daylight) go to the finals, then it's all roulette. Final events are chosen at random, 1 vs. 1 competitions, single-elimination. Scholarships really aren't much for money, and a title is only something you can claim, not sell or spend.

This makes it unneccessary for camera crews to show up and big sponsorships, because the games take place at various locations making it very difficult to track all of the events happening. Viewer focus won't be maintained so people will stop watching and it would be taken off the tele anyways. As for the finals, if say it were a race, it would be in a location difficult for camera crews to set-up effectively to capture all the desirable angles. Even games like tag etc. would be difficult to track effectively without a literal gross number of cameras.

The ideal location for such an event would be a metropolitan area, ie: Chicago, Amsterdam, or even Moraco. Which could change up every year... At least, it's competetive on a traceur level and keeps the alure of big money sponsors out of the picture. Because who is going to see a shitty Nike logo on a shoe of a traceur who is doing a handspring out of an under bar.
So long as I have parkour I'm okay.

Offline Ryan Sannar

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #56 on: December 15, 2011, 02:45:31 PM »
Brilliant, any other ideas?
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Offline Ryan A. Vetter

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #57 on: December 15, 2011, 04:26:11 PM »
Brilliant, any other ideas?
I can't help but feel like this is an undeterminable expression, due to years of sarcastic conversations you'll have to tell me if this is earnest or sarcasm.
So long as I have parkour I'm okay.

Offline Ryan Sannar

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #58 on: December 16, 2011, 08:05:49 AM »
No sarcasm. Sorry I never meant to cause any problems. I sincerely think this is a good idea. Funding is the only real difficulty I see here.
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Offline Ryan A. Vetter

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Re: Competition in Parkour
« Reply #59 on: December 16, 2011, 09:27:52 PM »
Funding isn't really an issue, it's just a matter of collecting a group of ideal volunteers, the processing of a wristband, competition fee should cover the cost to manufacture and authenticate the wristband. Referees are obviously just volunteers, just ask them to wear an "official tee-shirt," and assign them to a specific location, it's the traceurs' job to find these locations and share their locations or not, some strategy involved too. Referees report the number of tallies for the traceurs at the end of the day. The finals would be pairing names out of a hat, letting them know, and letting them meet-up with the referee on-time, their responsibility.

Sponsorships for the event to be a cause for funding could be as simple as bring up their names so many times during announcements etc. Say if it were in Milwaukee, Bartolotta's Restaurants could be a sponsor. As for a metropolitan location there is literally hundreds of them. Weight groups/heights/gender would not be exclusive or inclusive, it would be a mass mesh of every type, whiach saves dangerous practices and/or diets. Scholarships could be for ADAPT, or a lesser known certification.

Volunteering and out-of pocket payments will drop the need for alot of funding. Again it's a "convention" type deal, like Comic-con, without all the desperate people. People, who are trying to sell books, or parkour related material could rent out a kiosk or stand to cover the costs of renting out a center or even something else. Which would leave sponsoring the cost of the scholarships and miscellaneous. I'd volunteer two weeks of my time to cover the costs of such an event.
So long as I have parkour I'm okay.