Author Topic: Parkour Banned in NYC  (Read 45219 times)

Offline Chanloeu Ek

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #140 on: August 24, 2010, 01:52:57 PM »
I don't know, but I'm hoping in the next few days either Sha himself or M2 can give us a bit of an update. I know they'll be working hard on it, so we'll hear of something soon, just be patient and cross your fingers. That goes for everyone!! :D
Don't fret, I am sure Sha will give an update soon. I believe he went to go talk about it to them about it, the park police.
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Offline Shawn Meilicke

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #141 on: August 24, 2010, 03:27:36 PM »
1755 votes :D
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Offline Jordan Ramirez

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #142 on: August 24, 2010, 05:27:03 PM »
Don't fret, I am sure Sha will give an update soon. I believe he went to go talk about it to them about it, the park police.

Yeah, park police lol. Well, I'm glad but still we need to have this resolved or at least get us an update. I'm waiting patiently lol
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Offline J. Gabriel Alvarez Manilla

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #143 on: August 24, 2010, 05:34:38 PM »
Hey look, guys! You made the news with some of my brethren in Mexico.
http://www.monosurbanos.com/noticias.htm#noticia_ny
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Offline hfksla

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #144 on: August 24, 2010, 05:37:09 PM »
Hey look, guys! You made the news with some of my brethren in Mexico.
http://www.monosurbanos.com/noticias.htm#noticia_ny
Wow, I am amazed at how much support we're getting.
This just shows how the global parkour family truly is a family.
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Offline Shawn Meilicke

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #145 on: August 24, 2010, 05:38:45 PM »
I love you guys

 :-*

Haha, jk. But I hear ya... I just hope this goes well for you guys
"Though all the world may hate us, we are named.
The shadow overtake us, we are known
We're more than carbon and chemicals
Free will is ours and we can't let go
We are the image of the invisible"
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Offline Chris Seaton

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #146 on: August 24, 2010, 05:40:04 PM »

Posts by Mr. Seaton should be interpreted as simply for either informational purposes or his own pure amusement, and are never to be construed as providing legal advice or forming an attorney-client relationship.

Offline Sha Mualimm-Ak

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #147 on: August 24, 2010, 07:05:32 PM »
I spoke with the State Park police sergeant (Sgt. Hendrix) in the Battery today, as well as the officer who told us about the ban earlier this week (officer Jordan), who was conveniently present at the time. In the end they were both VERY helpful, and receptive to allowing me to teach them about what parkour was, and what it's practitioners were all about. After about an hour long conversation, they had fully opened up to me and parkour in general, and gave me a number of tips and leads on directions to go in with getting parkour to be fully accepted in the NYC community. I've got a lot of work ahead of me, but in the mean time, I will be trying to turn Sunday's big gathering into a demo, under permit of the Battery Park authority, which apparently is both outside and above the jurisdiction of city park, and for the most part, state park rules and regulations. Officer Jordan was nice enough to give me the right phone number to call on this, and I will be making the call tomorrow, early in the day.

That said, here are the details about the "Ban", and the park police's position on this whole situation.

1. While Parkour IS essentially banned in battery park, there is no direct legal law in place created specifically for the banning of parkour, which ultimately gives us a snake with more than one head to fight. How the "Ban" works is that "Climbing on the walls/structures" in the park is deemed a "Reckless" use of state property, and using anything in a way it wasn't built for in general is something eligible for fine based on the regulations of the park.

2. "Punishable by 300$ fine" came from the fine for breaking the "Reckless use of..." regulation being about 50$, and the fine for "Non-compliance", meaning they asked us to stop (Like a million times in the past decade) and we came back, being a 250$ fine. So once you reached the point of being fined, fine-able transgressions will have amounted to a minimum of 300$.

In the end, speaking with the SGT, his paramount concern and what he told me would have to be resolved through our own efforts, was the issue of public safety. Basically the theory that "Once one of you are airborne, are you going to stop yourself in mid-air if a child jumps in front of you?". Now I spoke with him for a bit on the various ways traceurs keep themselves, and those around them in a safe situation when it comes to potential interaction/collision, and in the end HE was convinced. But he was telling me that the next step is to convince the park authority of the same thing, as liability is a huge issue, especially in NYC. His advice was to obtain some form of insurance for what we all do, so that we don't all train in these parks under the weak protection of "Assumed Risk" and "Train At your own risk". He stated that if what we did was insured, then we'd pretty much have free-reign, the police there themselves already trust and respect us essentially (hence us being able to train there for years in the first place), it's just that if their superiors tell them to kick us out, they have no choice. The SGT's suggestion was one made with the intention of "Allowing us to allow you to train here". This was the biggest issue.

They gave a couple of other suggestions, and I'll be acting on them full-heartedly starting yesterday, but at this moment, my next step is to turn Sunday's gathering into some form of organized, "Hey look, parkour is neat" demonstration. Officer Jordan gave me the number of the person I would need to speak to directly about organizing this, but I'm not optimistic about obtaining a permit for something like that in a few days. What I am optimistic about though is starting a dialog with this person, and if anything, schmooze our way into success on this, and if all else fails, i'll still be pointed in the direction of someone in an even higher position, who I'll be able to speak to about this directly. Which will be neat. It's all just a matter of time. In the mean time guys, if I can't get us clearance for this demo on such short notice, it's best we have the gathering in another place. But that subject is in the air right now. Info on that as soon as possible.

In the mean time everyone, sit tight. NYC natives, don't train in Battery at all for a little while, mostly because I said we wouldn't, and we look more organized and reputable as a community if the community actually does what the representative said they would do lol. If that isn't enough incentive, then don't go there or i'll beat you up. I will be addressing the community boards soon on this issue as well, and pretty much be playing public advocate on this whole issue. I'm very optimistic on the outcome of this, and certainly hope you all don't mind me representing you guys. I just want to see parkour be seen as the way it should in NYC, and based on my experience with the police sgt today, I just feel it's about the right person saying the right thing to the right people.

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #148 on: August 24, 2010, 07:19:04 PM »
I will assist Sha in the beatings...good work bro, glad to see you're managing to wade through the depths of the NYC bureaucracy and accomplish something.

Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #149 on: August 24, 2010, 08:13:01 PM »
Thank you for the update, Sha. I was signing the petition as you were typing your update, it appears! For the record, here is the comment I included:

Quote
Under existing laws (NYC Parks Department Rules, section 1-04(I)), certain areas and structures of the park are off-limits to climbing and related activities. As the parkour practitioners who use the Battery Park space are now aware of these laws, there is no need for further expansion of regulation to include the elimination of Parkour from the activities that New York's citizens enjoy in New York Parks. The distinction between climbing on a park structure, as defined in NYCPDR s. 1-04(I), and the general practice of parkour, is a critical and important distinction which, if not made, threatens civil liberties.

Please allow me to be so bold as to use this as an opportunity to share some thoughts about the necessity for proactive, positive p/r, as it affects all of us:

We all agree to and abide by the "be respectful of authorities when they ask you to leave" rule. But this is not enough. It is a starting point, not an end.

Response to parkour from authorities is like cockroaches: for every one you see, there are hundreds you don't. I'm not saying the authorities are like cockroaches, I'm saying their responses to parkour practitioners are. For every person who sees a traceur training, who calls the police to report it, there are dozens more who don't report it. These peoples' reactions are mixed and varied. We cannot control or predict how those people will interpret parkour, or what their previous exposure has been, or what their media experiences have been.

What this means is that you cannot use police/authority reaction to your training as a barometer for the generic "public picture" of parkour out there, among non-traceurs, in your community. There are people out there who "get it" and people out there who patently don't, and the vast majority of them are silent on the subject. Hard to imagine, since parkour is so central to our lives; but for most non-traceurs they might get a blip or two on their radar, find it interesting (or dangerous, or hooligan-y, or whatever), and then forget about it.

This can be a recipe for disaster, unless you are proactive about it.

Don't wait for the authorities to come, and then respond to them respectfully. Go to the authorities and begin the education process. It's not a matter of walking up to City Hall and just walking in and asking to speak to someone. It is a long, continuous progression (that should sound familiar to most of us). You have to get your positive message about parkour into their minds and their understanding before they have the opportunity to hear about it another way. So when someone calls the police to report your activity, the officers can respond with, "Oh, it's parkour. Yes, we know about it, we'll go check it out, but I'm sure there's nothing to worry about," versus, "There are people climbing things? We will send someone right away!"

So how do you go about it? It will vary from community to community depending on your local culture, the size of your city, and other factors. But here are some general tips:

1. Think beyond the police. The police are usually the first responders, and the first official community members to interact with us. And it's usually predisposed to a negative interaction because they are responding on behalf of a concerned citizen. It's their job to protect the citizens from danger (perceived or real), or to at least check it out. Their role as first responders makes them seem like a logical first step in your outreach efforts. But the opposite is usually true.

Instead, think of other entities within your local government who would be receptive to parkour. Public Health departments, school systems, youth groups, urban outreach programs... these are the kinds of entities that are more likely to "get" parkour and be receptive to its positive aspects right out of the gate. Seek them out and contact them. Let them know about a positive new activity that could benefit their organization (and mention specific examples: healthier citizens, better self-esteem for kids in rough neighborhoods, better academic performance, etc.) Position yourself as an authority on parkour and as a resource for their organization. Leave it open to pique their curiosity ("I'm sure our organization can help you achieve your goals of XYZ. I'd be happy to set up a time to meet with you to discuss ways in which we can work together for the betterment of ABC."), and try to arrange a meeting. There, you can present a positive message.

2. Have a product or service already in hand to offer. Don't just show up to the meeting and talk about how great parkour is, and hope they love it as much as you do. They may need help seeing in concrete ways how your parkour organization can help their organization. So be ready to present a proposal: free workshops for youth groups, a performance/demo at a city event, etc. It helps if you can dovetail it with something the city is already doing. For instance, if the city has programs to get people more physically active (e.g. offering tai chi in the park or something), offer to partner with the tai chi group and provide balance and agility workshops (not strictly parkour per se, but it's a small progression in that direction... you get the idea).

3. Start small. If you try to go too big too soon, or try to go straight to the top, bureaucracy will get in your way. Don't start by trying to offer training to the city police and the mayor's bodyguards. If you try to start there they will ask for insurance, waivers, permits, etc. Many of these things are tough to come up with if your organization is small or informal. Instead, try to find a smaller niche to start in. For instance, offer to do a couple of workshops with Boys and Girls Clubs, or be a guest speaker/demonstrator/coach for a high school gymnastics team for a while. Through your professional delivery of these workshops and what have you, you will establish a level of "professional cred" that you can leverage for bigger fish later on.

4. Stand and deliver. From your very first "gig," whether it's a small youth workshop or a side-stage demo at the county fair, bring your A-game. This does not mean you bring your biggest and fanciest tricks. What this means is you bring a level of excellence and professionalism to the project that will wow people. Be on time. Dress appropriately. Keep safety at the forefront, always. Don't curse/swear, or use foul language. Don't spit or farmer blow. Use please and thank you and yes sir/yes ma'am. Thank those who gave you a chance to perform/do a workshop/train/get your foot in the door, and thank them profusely and repeatedly. Show that you work hard. Don't be a d00d. Even if you're doing a 10-minute demo on the side stage in the rain at the East Jesus County Fair, you are still representing all of parkour, and all traceurs, for all of us. Don't let us down.

5. Be aware of connections, and follow them to their natural conclusions. Network, network, network! Is your cousin in a bowling league with the police chief's brother-in-law? Use the next bowling night as an opportunity to plant a positive seed about parkour in the right person's ear. After your stunningly professional demo at the County Fair, do some research and see if the Fair coordinator works with anyone else in government that might be interested in parkour. Contact that person, and mention the fair.

6. Ask, and ye shall receive (sometimes, but often enough that it's worth it). Once you've made one small positive connection with a government official, no matter how "small" on the totem pole, explain the challenges that parkour is facing (don't complain, explain). Ask graciously if your connection has any recommendations for next steps, either names of other people to contact, or other outlets for your group. Most people in this situation are happy to help out and will gladly give you contact information or other suggestions that you can follow up on.

7. Give a little to get a little. You will have to stick your neck out and be willing to go 75% to get the other person's 25%. It won't usually be a 50-50 relationship in the beginning. This doesn't mean you should just sit back and get taken advantage of, but it does mean that you have to show a very obvious good-faith effort to get parkour on positive footing. Because parkour is so misunderstood, a lot of non-traceurs who are willing to support it early on are risking quite a lot. Always be mindful of that risk they are taking on your behalf, and make it clear that you appreciate it and are willing to go the extra mile to ensure their risk is minimized. They stick their neck out for you, you have to give 110% to make their decision to support parkour look good (and by extension you will make parkour look good).

8. Repetition works. We see this in our training all the time, right? It's no different for parkour p/r. Get the positive word out early, often, and in a broad sense. So the newspaper did a great positive feature on your group last year. Maybe it's time to give them a heads-up about the great community service you're doing. Like they say at Parkour Generations, "Once is Never." One article or positive feature won't cut it. If you don't know how to write a press release (properly), learn. More importantly, have something truly newsworthy to communicate. "Johnny did his first backflip," = who cares (besides Johnny and his crew)? "Parkour Group X is doing an obstacle run for the United Way" = newsworthy. This means you have to hustle to always be coming up with newsworthy events for your group, and staying on top of the press releases. Just getting together and training when people feel like it won't cut it.

9. Repetition works, part 2 (also referred to as the Chinese Water Torture). Every chance you get, put in a positive word for parkour (without being an annoying demagogue). It's like salt in food--a little sprinkle here or there enhances the flavor, too much is bad. Drop a couple positive sentences about parkour into regular conversations with non-traceurs when they become relevant. For instance, if you're at school and talking to a teacher about a large project or difficult assignment, mention that your parkour practice helped you focus during a study break and you were able to finish it. Or if you are volunteering at a hospital and your mentor brings up smoking, mention how you have seen how parkour can help people quit. Don't go on and on about it. Keep it simple, a few positive comments here and there. Over time they add up.

10. Talking points. Politicians use them for a reason. People have remarkably short attention spans. Stick to, maybe, 5 (let's say: safety, utility, respect, leave no trace, physical and mental strength). These are your anchor points. Don't get into protracted arguments with people, or go on and on like an enraptured cult member. These turn people off. Instead, respond to peoples' impressions with a corollary talking point:

"Parkour, eh? Isn't that where you jump off buildings?"
"No, actually. It's definitely not that. Parkour is a very safe activity when done properly. Most of what you see on TV is not a good example."

And STOP there. They will experience a moment of cognitive dissonance, where they thought they knew what something was, and then were told (by presumably an expert) that it was wrong. Let them wrestle with it. 90% of the time this inner conflict will prompt them to ask you for more. Give it to them, little by little, as they ask for it. But stick to the Talking Points until your audience is ready to hear the nitty gritty. This means that in order to be successful here, you will have to LISTEN to your audience more than you will have to talk to them.

************

The bottom line is, as ambassadors of parkour, and we *all* are, whether we like it or not, we have a responsibility to be proactive about how its image is spread. This means not waiting until the authorities have been called (or have seen parkour misrepresented on TV), but being in control of the message they get, so their first impression is the best impression. We have to reach out to them, to everyone.

You will get the most success if you frame your message-sending in small steps, dedication, repetition, and respect (huh, kinda sounds like training, eh?).

I hope this post is helpful to people. I kinda just started babbling. :) Having (so far!) established a pretty successful community in southern Wisconsin, I thought my experiences might be useful to some.

BACK ON TOPIC:

Thank you again, Sha, for this update and for your hard work with New York. Best of luck to you; let me know if I can be of any help. We have positive relations with our mayor and several police jurisdictions in our city. Madison, WI is not New York, but if anything we can do to help you out comes up, let me know and we will try.
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and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
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Offline MThomasfreerun

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #150 on: August 24, 2010, 08:30:57 PM »
I liked nearly everything you wrote  :) (although I think anyone who attempts to implement it all might not have much time left to train).


While not the specific point of your post, I feel compelled to comment on this:

Quote
10. Talking points. Politicians use them for a reason. People have remarkably short attention spans. Stick to, maybe, 5 (let's say: safety, utility, respect, leave no trace, physical and mental strength). These are your anchor points. Don't get into protracted arguments with people, or go on and on like an enraptured cult member. These turn people off. Instead, respond to peoples' impressions with a corollary talking point:

"Parkour, eh? Isn't that where you jump off buildings?"
"No, actually. It's definitely not that. Parkour is a very safe activity when done properly. Most of what you see on TV is not a good example."

Specifically it's the implication that parkour "definitely" isn't jumping off buildings.  In fact, many experienced and high-level free runners jump off buildings as part of their parkour endeavors - people like David Belle, Sebastien Foucan, Damien Walters, Daniel Ilabaca, just to name a few.

While I recognize that this wasn't your point, I think that within your overall message it's important not to be disingenuous when approached - if a police officer says "isn't that where you jump off of buildings?" in response to you telling him you are doing parkour, it's obvious he's on the right track. Cops don't give a damn about a lesson in terminology. I think a better response would be more along the lines of "Well, some people who practice parkour do things like that, but that's not the goal, and that's not what we are doing here" (assuming you aren't, in fact, doing that there).

Informing the lay people is important, I absolutely agree. I would just add that it's important to be true to all aspects of the discipline, whether you partake in them or not.
"Obstacles - I go over, under, right through, around 'em" - Shed Light

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Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #151 on: August 24, 2010, 08:49:51 PM »
Thank you. :)

True, semantically, "definitely" is not the right word choice there. However from a standpoint of rhetorical strategy, it's a good word to use when part of a talking point.

The whole strategy of talking points is based on the idea that listeners' attention spans are short, and therefore you want to convey a very clear, brightline idea in a very short message. There should be enough information in the talking point to get them to press for more.

We can assume that the person has been exposed to enough "roof jumping" data about parkour because he/she asked about it. Therefore, the disconnect between what they think they know and what they've just been told should (and does, in my experience), get them to ask for more.

I agree that eventually you can and should have the roof conversation with them--yes, many high-level practitioners do roof-jumping. Yes, it is an aspect of parkour. But it is such a small part, and it is certainly not the sum total, or defining movement, of parkour. Arguably the risks of even allowing the roof a smidge of authority in the conversation, before the person has a solid understanding of parkour, are greater than the risks of their perception of misinformation.

The central idea behind the talking point strategy is that you use small bits of information in a repetitive way to shape peoples' preconceptions about things, to build a basis of knowledge from which they can approach more nuanced information in a critical/educated way.

And yes, the talking point strategy can be (and is!) abused to misinform. That's basic political strategy. But in this case IMO it wins out in the risk/benefits analysis.

Just my opinion, of course.

On a separate note...

Yes, managing all of those things can leave very little time to train. But it can be done and in my very passionate opinion is a critical component of the job description for any local "scene leader."
She followed slowly, taking a long time,
as though there were some obstacle in the way;
and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
--excerpt from Going Blind, Rainer Maria Rilke

www.madisonparkour.com

Offline Gabe Arnold

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #152 on: August 24, 2010, 09:27:44 PM »
In the end, speaking with the SGT, his paramount concern and what he told me would have to be resolved through our own efforts, was the issue of public safety. Basically the theory that "Once one of you are airborne, are you going to stop yourself in mid-air if a child jumps in front of you?". Now I spoke with him for a bit on the various ways traceurs keep themselves, and those around them in a safe situation when it comes to potential interaction/collision, and in the end HE was convinced. But he was telling me that the next step is to convince the park authority of the same thing, as liability is a huge issue, especially in NYC. His advice was to obtain some form of insurance for what we all do, so that we don't all train in these parks under the weak protection of "Assumed Risk" and "Train At your own risk". He stated that if what we did was insured, then we'd pretty much have free-reign, the police there themselves already trust and respect us essentially (hence us being able to train there for years in the first place), it's just that if their superiors tell them to kick us out, they have no choice. The SGT's suggestion was one made with the intention of "Allowing us to allow you to train here". This was the biggest issue.

Forgive me for saying so, but I see a social-business opportunity here: Parkour practitioner insurance, available to all. For a small monthly or yearly fee, an insurance company can cover you and provide some kind of identification, maybe like a car insurance card, that you can carry. I know the BPCA (British Parkour Coaching Association) provides insurance coverage for their instructors. Why not figure something out so everyone can have it?

Of course I'm sure the argument would be something like "isn't this like that mutant registration they had in the X-Men movies?! Doesn't this go against the principle of freedom in movement?!" Well, yes, sort of. But I'd rather plunk down some cash and a few personal details for the chance to train with less restrictions and hassles in the long run.

Back on topic, great to hear how things are moving along Sha and company. Having trained with you guys and gals in the past I know you'll do well and make the community proud. Let us know if there's anything you need. Good luck and god speed! 

Offline Ryan Nicolai

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #153 on: August 24, 2010, 09:30:31 PM »
Sha, thank you for keeping us all updated with how things are going in NYC and handling it in such an excellent way.

Muse, thank you so much for posting this. It's something I will definitely keep in mind as I attempt to put together a community out here.

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Offline MThomasfreerun

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #154 on: August 24, 2010, 09:39:55 PM »
Thank you. :)

True, semantically, "definitely" is not the right word choice there. However from a standpoint of rhetorical strategy, it's a good word to use when part of a talking point.

The whole strategy of talking points is based on the idea that listeners' attention spans are short, and therefore you want to convey a very clear, brightline idea in a very short message. There should be enough information in the talking point to get them to press for more.

We can assume that the person has been exposed to enough "roof jumping" data about parkour because he/she asked about it. Therefore, the disconnect between what they think they know and what they've just been told should (and does, in my experience), get them to ask for more.

I agree that eventually you can and should have the roof conversation with them--yes, many high-level practitioners do roof-jumping. Yes, it is an aspect of parkour. But it is such a small part, and it is certainly not the sum total, or defining movement, of parkour. Arguably the risks of even allowing the roof a smidge of authority in the conversation, before the person has a solid understanding of parkour, are greater than the risks of their perception of misinformation.

The central idea behind the talking point strategy is that you use small bits of information in a repetitive way to shape peoples' preconceptions about things, to build a basis of knowledge from which they can approach more nuanced information in a critical/educated way.

And yes, the talking point strategy can be (and is!) abused to misinform. That's basic political strategy. But in this case IMO it wins out in the risk/benefits analysis.

Just my opinion, of course.

On a separate note...

Yes, managing all of those things can leave very little time to train. But it can be done and in my very passionate opinion is a critical component of the job description for any local "scene leader."

Agreed on all counts. Also, thank you for presenting information that drives the topic forward. It seems rare these days...
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Offline NOS - from Parkour Mumbai

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #155 on: August 24, 2010, 11:47:44 PM »
Muse, you're my new hero. ;D
Thanks for presenting a good primer on PR work, it would help not just for Parkour, but any other activity as well. I was surprised how little of it I was doing myself after reading through it all. Need to start incorporating that stuff into our work over here in Mumbai.
Do you have a business degree by any chance?

Offline NOS - from Parkour Mumbai

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #156 on: August 24, 2010, 11:50:12 PM »
Sha, good to hear you've finally got things under control, and in the end it turned out to be nothing more than what MThomasfreerun had already deduced and nothing bigger.

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #157 on: August 25, 2010, 01:33:32 AM »
Wow. Props to Sha for resolving this. And thanks to the others that contributed
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Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #158 on: August 25, 2010, 06:06:26 AM »
Muse, you're my new hero. ;D
Thanks for presenting a good primer on PR work, it would help not just for Parkour, but any other activity as well. I was surprised how little of it I was doing myself after reading through it all. Need to start incorporating that stuff into our work over here in Mumbai.
Do you have a business degree by any chance?

You and MThomas are both too kind. :) Glad my ramblings could help. No, I do not have a business degree but I have life experience (personal and professional) in this area and I have been told I have a "knack" for networking/public relations, although I'm sure peoples' impressions are exaggerated.

I'm very excited to hear how things work out for Sha and parkour in NYC as his meetings move forward.
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she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
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Offline Dom Rocco

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Re: Parkour Banned in NYC
« Reply #159 on: August 25, 2010, 06:20:27 AM »
I don't want to get locked up on Muir Island