Author Topic: Identifying spine problem in rolls  (Read 2400 times)

Offline AsianBorat

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Identifying spine problem in rolls
« on: November 07, 2009, 02:04:17 PM »
I"m sorry if this sounds like a stupid question, but how exactly can you tell if the roll is putting too much stress on your spine? I mean, yes, I'm rolling more or less diagonally, but I can't tell whether I should take the slight discomfort on my back as a warning symbol or not.

Oh, and what part of the spine is supposed to contact the floor?

Offline Hazim Salem

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Re: Identifying spine problem in rolls
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2009, 08:00:57 PM »
Some traceurs don't let their spine contact the floor at all.
I don't know how you can tell "discomfort", or how skinny or not skinny you are, but if you stand up after the roll and still feel your spine hurting, it's pain. =/

Offline AsianBorat

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Re: Identifying spine problem in rolls
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2009, 09:30:55 PM »
I forgot to elaborate on that. By "discomfort", I meant by how I have to occasionally stretch out my spine after I'm done with rolling (this applies to my shoulders and legs as well, but those are a non-issue). However, there is no pain, and my rolls feel pretty smooth.

Offline Hazim Salem

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Re: Identifying spine problem in rolls
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2009, 10:08:02 PM »
I forgot to elaborate on that. By "discomfort", I meant by how I have to occasionally stretch out my spine after I'm done with rolling (this applies to my shoulders and legs as well, but those are a non-issue). However, there is no pain, and my rolls feel pretty smooth.

The thing with pain is that it will deform your spine surface. And, I'm not sure what you mean by "stretch out my spine" and I don't want to start saying stuff o__o but definitely keep asking for advice.

Offline AsianBorat

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Re: Identifying spine problem in rolls
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2009, 11:41:01 PM »
Woahhh, I was being ridiculously vague there. ("/is basically asleep in front of my keyboard" It happens :P)

Here's what I meant to say: You know how when you're standing up, then you turn to the left and the right, and your back cracks? (which, btw, is a very satisfying way to stretch) Well, I end up having to do that after I perform several rolls. There's no pain, but I'm wondering if my back is still being deformed in any way. Or does this happen naturally to people who are practicing rolls?

Offline Hazim Salem

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Re: Identifying spine problem in rolls
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2009, 01:56:19 PM »
Well, back in the days, I thought pain was OK, so i kept rolling on my spine. Now, I don't think my bone is deformed, but the skin above that is thick (looks like a bruise but normal skin color). So idk, maybe it's like your hands getting thicker skin with vaults and climbs. =/
I also crack my back, it's niceeeeeeeee.

Offline Brian Rowe

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Re: Identifying spine problem in rolls
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2009, 09:21:01 PM »
Try breaking down the roll. Lie on your back and roll up to the contact point of your shoulder, feet in the air. Let your torso expand (relax) until your lower back, on the other side of the spine, makes contact. Contract again so that you are sitting on one butt-cheek. You should never feel your spine hit the floor. As you go back and forth, the movement should get faster and smoother, so the contractions and expansions are barely noticeable, but still keeping your spine off the ground.

When rolling, keep in mind that your body does not have to be crunched into a tiny ball or shaped like a perfect wheel. Loosen up. Try exhaling as you roll so your upper body isn't so stiff.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2009, 09:23:51 PM by Rowe »

Offline AsianBorat

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Re: Identifying spine problem in rolls
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2009, 10:54:28 PM »
Thanks...that helped  ;D

After breaking down my roll, I discovered three things:

1) Yup, too much pressure on my spine :/

2) Lazy hand placement, especially by not pushing down hard enough, is THE source of error for me. Correcting this helped immensely.

3) Sideways roll > QM roll  ;D ;D ;D                     (just messing with you, Adam ^_^)

    But yeah, the sideways roll feels a lot nicer for me. Lifting off is a little awkward, but I'm sure I can fix that.

Nonetheless, my roll is far from perfect. I'll need to practice a lot more before I even think about going on concrete, and that's not counting the fact that I have yet to roll with my left shoulder :-(

Damn you ambidextrous people!!! "shakes fist"

Offline Adam McC

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Re: Identifying spine problem in rolls
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2009, 08:15:23 PM »
Hahaha. I assume you've seen my tutorial.

That's why I have those options! QM feels good to my body, but lots of people prefer the sideways exit, so I'm glad it works well for you. Keep playing. Rolls take time and effort to discover, unfortunately.

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Offline Jake Vigil

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Re: Identifying spine problem in rolls
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2009, 08:19:25 PM »
Hahaha. I assume you've seen my tutorial.

That's why I have those options! QM feels good to my body, but lots of people prefer the sideways exit, so I'm glad it works well for you. Keep playing. Rolls take time and effort to discover, unfortunately.


Agreed. After a year, my rolls STILL suck, i've never been able to find the right spot so I just avoid them (I also avoid dropping of anything higher than 4 feet like anyone else would avoid dropping from 60)
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Offline Adam McC

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Re: Identifying spine problem in rolls
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2009, 04:38:54 AM »

Agreed. After a year, my rolls STILL suck, i've never been able to find the right spot so I just avoid them (I also avoid dropping of anything higher than 4 feet like anyone else would avoid dropping from 60)

And thats okay! It took me a year and a half before I could do one on concrete smoothly. There's so many elements that go into your roll. Timing, structure, position, placement, and so many variables inbetween. Just be patient, you'll get it.

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