Author Topic: Winter Training  (Read 14459 times)

Offline Mitchell

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #40 on: October 15, 2009, 07:30:05 PM »
When it snowed on Monday I put on full snow gear and went out. Turns out I can do everything except for my precisions and beam runs in snow pants, winter jacket, gloves, facemask, and hiking boots. Really excited for when it actually hits!
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Offline zayn

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #41 on: October 16, 2009, 05:08:52 AM »
When it snowed on Monday I put on full snow gear and went out. Turns out I can do everything except for my precisions and beam runs in snow pants, winter jacket, gloves, facemask, and hiking boots. Really excited for when it actually hits!
gona be cold here in indiana but im ready
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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #42 on: October 17, 2009, 11:04:28 AM »
all i need is some good gloves and a face mask
but i dont have either

Offline Mitchell

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #43 on: October 18, 2009, 08:29:54 PM »
all i need is some good gloves and a face mask
but i dont have either

Gander Mountain sells underarmour masks that go half and full head (Ninja and ski-mask) that are ridiculously kick-ass for $25. I stuck my head out the window going 75 on the freeway with goggles on and the mask at half-head yesterday in 33°, held it out there for a good 30 seconds, and my cheeks felt like the wind hadn't even touched 'em. I think they make some pretty amazing gloves too, but all they had was hunter camo when last I went.
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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #44 on: October 19, 2009, 05:37:39 AM »
all i need is some good gloves and a face mask
but i dont have either

Gander Mountain sells underarmour masks that go half and full head (Ninja and ski-mask) that are ridiculously kick-ass for $25. I stuck my head out the window going 75 on the freeway with goggles on and the mask at half-head yesterday in 33°, held it out there for a good 30 seconds, and my cheeks felt like the wind hadn't even touched 'em. I think they make some pretty amazing gloves too, but all they had was hunter camo when last I went.


ok awsome,l  just one question
where is Gander Mountain?

Offline Nicholas Schiebel

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #45 on: October 19, 2009, 06:30:56 AM »
I'm just using my usual gear:

White Sweats and hoodie with my nike's...
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Offline Scared Doggy

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #46 on: October 19, 2009, 12:44:34 PM »
all i need is some good gloves and a face mask
but i dont have either

Gander Mountain sells underarmour masks that go half and full head (Ninja and ski-mask) that are ridiculously kick-ass for $25. I stuck my head out the window going 75 on the freeway with goggles on and the mask at half-head yesterday in 33°, held it out there for a good 30 seconds, and my cheeks felt like the wind hadn't even touched 'em. I think they make some pretty amazing gloves too, but all they had was hunter camo when last I went.
So you're saying the gloves they have there are perfect for winter training? Because I have poor circulation in my fingers and I'm sick of winter gloves that don't keep my hands warm.
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Offline Alec H

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #47 on: October 19, 2009, 01:03:44 PM »
I checked on their website and I couldn't find anything like that...

Offline eryn o

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #48 on: October 23, 2009, 07:55:55 AM »
Okay, really though, I'm not originally from here, so I still don't have this winter thing quite figured out yet..

What do you wear to train in the cold? The only way I've figured out how to stay warm are Ugg boots and several layers of poofy coats and sweaters, which is obviously not desirable. Also, gloves are a necessity, but ones that are thin enough to still use my hands don't keep me warm. This crappy weather is making me panic. Tell me how the athletes do it...
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Offline Chad Zwadlo (Zwadloc)

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #49 on: October 23, 2009, 08:24:35 AM »
I've never really done PK in the winter, but I intend to start a bit this time around.  Even though I've lived in this general part of the world my whole life, I dispise cold weather.  However, I do a lot of snowboarding and it's pretty freakin' cold up on a big hill like that sometimes.  My normal outfit is -

Upper body = some sort of underarmour or similar undershirt, a long sleeve t-shirt, a short sleeve t-shirt, a hoodie, and if things are too extreme I've got a special blend snowboarding jacket that has an inside removable layer so I can just wear the bottom layer if it's a little cold or the top layer if I'm worried about getting wet (it's water proof) or both if it's ridiculous (I've never had to wear both)

Head = Underarmour "ninja hood" thing that has a top part and a face mask, and a double layer underarmour stocking hat with nylon on the inside and cotton on the outside.  Any sort of face mask will work, but I like the ninja hood type things because they have that extra layer over your head to keep the warmfness in  ;D   Also the snowboarding goggles help a lot when flying down a hill at 40mph in -20 degrees or so

Hands = Underarmour thin gloves (great for mobility, not so great for warmth...work well as a bottom layer), Zero brand gloves that have two seperatable layers much like my jacket (mittens actually work better for staying warm), and for snowboarding I also have some leather protectors that go over my gloves to keep them from getting destroyed by the tow ropes.  Hands are my biggest issue for winter PK.  You can't wear big fat gloves and still move over railings and do cat grabs, but you can't just wear the little underarmour things if you don't want your fingers to fall off.  My best thought so far is to not do rail work and cat grabs in winter.

Lower body = Underwear (the thicker the better, I've never really tried the long underwear thing but I imagine it would work well), If it's really cold I'll put on a pair of underarmour shorts but they tend to bunch up and be really uncomfortable, regular pants (something not too prone to absorbing lots of water, jeans work ok), Special Blend snowpants that connect directly to my jacket for a full waterproof seal.  I find that your legs won't get too cold when your out running around a lot so this part isn't really important.

Feet = Nylon knee high snowboarding socks (greatest thing I've ever bought for cold weather, super warm and won't soak up water very much), another pair of regular socks if it's really cold, Crazy snowboarding boots that won't work with PK.  I'm guessing your normal shoes will probably be fine with the right pair of socks underneith as long as your not wearing something like Aasics shoes that are about 75% mesh.

I'm guessing if I go training this winter I'll be wearing something similar to this set up.  the real trick is to dress in layers.  If you've got too much on it's easy to take some off, if you don't have enough...you freeze.  I'd also recommend keeping training times down to an hour or less in really cold weather before you go inside to warm up for a while before going out again.  And be super careful in anything under 10 degrees or so, the water vapor in the air and the moisture in your lungs can start to crystalize when you breath and form scar tissue in your lungs causing permanent damage...face mask very important!

Offline Joseph S

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #50 on: October 23, 2009, 08:24:47 PM »
Chad, you need some fat on your body: it will save money on all that complicated gear!  Fundamentally, you're right, though, breathing is going to be the roughest, but I think you're mostly there with those balaclavas you were discussing.  Head socks.  Whichever.  Breathe through your nose and cover your face with a neoprene breathing mask, and you're good down to minus 20 F.  This is why we have noses, you know: filter / warm the air.  The other trick is to constrict the back of your throat slightly; the turbulence warms you up as you breathe in. 

When Gore-Tex became a consumer technology in the late 1980's (by consumer, you could actually find it), I think it was pretty expensive.  Nowadays, it is just high-end.  They make it in lightweight jackets and pants.  Make sure it has an elastic fitting at the cuffs and waist, and the zippers or snaps are double-over.  I'm a little concerned about it ripping, though.  A second layer for arms and legs makes sense.  Lycra.  Another invention from the 80's, I think.   Just trap the air somehow; air is an excellent insulator if it stays put.   Feet seem the hardest to figure out for me. 

The runners have all this figured out.  I see them orbiting the lake, year-round.  I'll just go ask one.  My main concern about winter Parkour is traction.  We ought to meet those Quebecois this year and show that we, too embrace our environment, year-round. 

One thing is for sure: the cold will keep us moving.  Still can't believe I moved here from the beach. 
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Offline Scared Doggy

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #51 on: October 23, 2009, 08:36:15 PM »
Vexar, if you find the secret to keeping your feet warm and water proof, please do post it here.
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Offline eryn o

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #52 on: October 24, 2009, 09:51:34 AM »
Vexar, if you find the secret to keeping your feet warm and water proof, please do post it here.

There might be something better, but I wear merino wool socks in the winter. They're really warm and thick but don't let you get too sweaty. Something like http://thesocksite.com/antimicrobial-merino-wool-outdoor-trail-socks-4-pack-p-582.html?zenid=fd2440dd567c41c0729587ca346dbc5a
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Offline Nicholas Schiebel

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #53 on: October 24, 2009, 10:56:54 AM »
Try silicon spray, Doggy. It helps make whatever you spray it with, water resistant, and thus, dry and warm. And it's cheap too.
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Offline mospunk

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #54 on: October 24, 2009, 12:49:14 PM »
A few thoughts from a lifelong winter outdoorsman:

Two of the greatest inventions on earth for feet:

1. Smartwool socks - they're a little spendy, but totally worth it.  I wear them almost exclusively.  They make every variety from heavy trekking socks to low-cut running socks.  Experiment to see what you like.  Midwest Mountaineering will be having it's Fall Expo in November, and they always have a deal on them, usually buy one get one half off.

2.  Nikwax brand waterproofing for shoes - This is by far the most reliable product for waterproofing shoes.  There are several different varieties depending on what your shoes are made of.  Of course, if your shoes have a lot of mesh, nothing will work well, because there's too much air space between it.  That's why I recommend shoes that are mostly leather or at least solid fabric of some kind.  It needs to be re-applied usually once a year, but one container has lasted me for the last 10 years.

In regard to staying warm in the winter, it doesn't need to be too complicated or high tech.  I would say don't waste your time with Gore Tex jackets and such for PK.  A good windbreaker (old or from Goodwill) to keep wind out is fine, and if you're doing serious PK, you don't want anything too nice because it might get ripped.  I've used my Pearlizumi brand windbreaker and it's held up just fine.  Gore Tex tends to be less breathable and will get really hot quickly. 

Personally, I think face masks are useless, because the moisture in your breath freezes and then have a big ice chunk over your mouth.  And Chad, that bit about moisture crystalizing in your lungs is BS.  I've been a Nordic skier since I was 5 and have trained in up to -40 weather without covering my mouth (cheeks, chin and the rest of my face were, however).  My lungs are just fine.  If your lungs are cold enough for moisture to crystalize, you'd be dead already.  The easiest way to dealing with the cold is by getting outside regularly now as it starts to get colder.  Acclimatize yourself gradually with cardio work where you're forced to breath a little heavier and your body will adjust.  Also focus on breathing through your nose, as Vexar said.  For the face, try some Vaseline or Dermatone.  They keep in heat and moisture, even in biting winds.

As for a few other things:
Gloves: find lightweight Windstopper gloves (my Nordic ski gloves are Windstopper and they rule) and use synthetic liners.  In terms of grip, there's not a lot you can do, but I've found that a little duct tape will help for durability, although not great for grip.

Pants: Try polypropelene long underwear.  It's not annoying like lycra-based layers like Underarmour, but it's still warm, moisture-wicking, and feels more like cotton against the skin.  A decent pair of windpants will work too.  Most good brands will all be decently water-resistant, meaning they'll be fine in snow.  Not so great if you're on wet ground from rain or melting snow though. 

Chad is right about wearing layers.  I usually go as light as possible as not to restrict movement, but I'll always keep an extra layer on hand (fleece vest, extra socks, etc.).  The most important thing about winter clothing though is NO COTTON!  It soaks up moisture and stays cold.  If you have to wear it, make sure you have a couple of synthetic layers against your skin.  Cotton can be quite dangerous in wet, cold conditions.

If you can, carry a warm drink with you.  That will help a lot too.  Save the hot toddies for afterward though.  :P

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Offline Chad Zwadlo (Zwadloc)

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #55 on: October 24, 2009, 03:19:16 PM »
Alright, so I've been told for years living up here in this fine winter wonderland and being a snowboarder that inhaling really cold air could damage your lungs.  They even said that the damage would be so minor that you'ld never really notice it.  Being an asthmatic for my whole life I figured I just wouldn't take any chances and always wore the face masks and never stayed out too long when it was super cold.  However, I never really knew, I was just going on what people said.  Assuming that Mospunk knew more about it than I did, I figured I'd go do a little research on the net (not that the net is super reliable either though) and found that it is indeed IMPOSSIBLE to freeze any part of your lungs or airway.  Apparently the human body is too adapted (mine sure doesn't feel like it though) and just handles the problem in it's own ways and it really can't happen.  It's a huge misconception around up here though and I'm glad I'm now better informed.  I'll still wear my facemask though...cause it makes me look all ninja  ;D

Offline eryn o

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #56 on: October 24, 2009, 03:45:59 PM »
I'll still wear my facemask though...cause it makes me look all ninja  ;D

That was my first thought when you said it. I was like... really? :P
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Offline mospunk

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #57 on: October 24, 2009, 08:56:37 PM »
Chad, do you have one of those cool face masks with the skeleton mouth on it?  Those are even more bada$$, or maybe just too Halloween-y.

You'll always be my personal favorite ninja.  Did Clark ever get a pic of you in Duluth when you wrapped your shirt around your head in ninja form?
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Offline Chad Zwadlo (Zwadloc)

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #58 on: October 25, 2009, 04:42:46 AM »
I checked those facemasks out once, a friend of mine has one.  But they are sold only at Harley shops as far as I know and the smallest size I've ever seen is like an XL...doesn't really work with my skinny face.  I sure hope no one took any pictures of me with my t-shirt on my head  :P

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Re: Winter Training
« Reply #59 on: October 26, 2009, 05:46:08 AM »
stilll  looking  for gloves  and a face mask   :P